Congress is still shutdown. But that hasn’t stopped thousands of cialis for woman immigrants from gathering in Washington this month to protest the buy real viagra online without prescription lack of comprehensive immigration reform.

This week, Sonic Trace partnered with To The generic viagra Point to explore the buy viagra in canada story of one young activist, Lizbeth Mateo. For almost a decade Lizbeth has performed acts of civil disobedience across the buy cheap viagra online country. But this summer, she took it to a new level. On July 30, her and soft viagra a group of eight undocumented young people — who had left the canadian generic viagra online US or had been deported — tried to enter legally through the cialis soft pills Nogales port of entry in Arizona.

Listen to the whole segment on To The Point or to Lizbeth’s story here …

Lizbeth at her home in LA, two months after crossing the border in Nogales, Ariz.

Lizbeth at her home in LA, two months after crossing the mexico viagra border in Nogales, Ariz.

One of our favorite parts got cut from the cialis without rx broadcast piece. Here is a snippet of a conversation that Lizbeth had with her mom, Maria, about their legal status.

Lizbeth arrived to the U.S. as a teen. We asked her what her process of assimilation to life in Los Angeles was like:

Lizbeth Mateo graduated from Cal State Northridge in 2008.

Lizbeth Mateo graduated from Cal State Northridge in 2008.

 

 

 

Lizbeth has been politically active for about a decade. At the viagra usa beginning, she had a hard time telling her parents about the order cialis no rx acts of civil disobedience that she participated in. For example, camping out in Sen. John McCain’s in a cap and buy cialis online canada gown to protest the rejection of the cialis professional 20 mg DREAM Act in Congress. But self-deporting to Mexico, and crossing back through Nogales, Sonora into Nogales, Arizona was just too big.

She talks about her parent’s reaction below:

Lizbeth Mateo with her brother at her grandmother's grave in her native village in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Lizbeth Mateo with her brother at her grandmother’s grave in her native village in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Lizbeth left for Mexico three weeks before crossing the border at the Nogales Port of Entry. Her first stop while in Mexico was her native village in Oaxaca. She had not been back in 15 years. She talks about coming home … or was it home?

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